Street Fighter IV

Chat that's general in nature. (Stuff that doesn't belong in any other forum.)

Moderator: Staffers

Street Fighter IV

Unread postby marus » October 18th, 2007, 5:52 am

http://www.streetfighterworld.com/

So after ten years, Capcom did the unthinkable and announced a new Street Fighter. What do you think? Will it be the revival of the American fighting game scene, or just a way to milk some money from the fanboys? I personally hope it'll be a huge success, and the start of the revival of the Capcom fighters, though the arcade being mostly dead (ignoring japan) will be a bit of an obstacle.
Last edited by marus on October 22nd, 2007, 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
KATTO!
User avatar
marus
Crack Desu!
 
Posts: 356
Joined: October 22nd, 2005, 9:57 am
Location: Washington (state)

Unread postby marus » October 22nd, 2007, 8:11 pm

Huh, I guess there's no love for Street Fighter here, eh? I guess that shouldn't be surprising considering SF has been dead in the casual market for a while, but still...
KATTO!
User avatar
marus
Crack Desu!
 
Posts: 356
Joined: October 22nd, 2005, 9:57 am
Location: Washington (state)

Unread postby drizzt_rocks » October 22nd, 2007, 11:01 pm

Well fighters are a dying genre except in japan. Plus I am very pissed off at capcom right now (mhf 3) ... Anyways I absolutely loved that trailer but I doubt that sf4 is gonna change anyone's view on fighters. If u didnt like them before u wouldnt like them now.
And the cutest anime character award goes to ... PINO
User avatar
drizzt_rocks
Crack Desu!
 
Posts: 399
Joined: April 19th, 2007, 1:43 pm
Location: Horny land

Unread postby marus » October 23rd, 2007, 5:13 am

Well I figure that this won't revolutionize fighters, but the presence of a new fighter in the mainstream might give the genre a well needed boost. There's hardly many new well-known fighters, especially 2D fighters in the U.S. From what I've seen though, most gamers know about Street Fighter, but don't or won't play it now because it's so old. I'm hoping that the release of a new Street Fighter, if advertised properly, can encourage people to give fighters another chance, and if the game does decent enough it may encourage the creation of more new fighters. At least that's what I'm hoping, but I'm probably being optimistic.
KATTO!
User avatar
marus
Crack Desu!
 
Posts: 356
Joined: October 22nd, 2005, 9:57 am
Location: Washington (state)

Unread postby -[J1N]- » October 23rd, 2007, 9:13 am

I've never been much of a street fighter fan, it just never grabbed me (the games). I did watch the anime series and all but that also didn't leave a large impact to me. It has been pretty dead recently, but it still shows up in my life in the form of Universal Fighting System (UFS) TCG. The trailer was (to me) quite a new turn, so I think it's a 'go for broke' situation.
["Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six."]
--Book of Revelation 13:18
User avatar
-[J1N]-
DESU DESU!
 
Posts: 548
Joined: September 15th, 2007, 10:29 am
Location: Look outside your window

Unread postby TheXev » October 23rd, 2007, 12:22 pm

IMO, its the genre's fans that are killing the genre. Hardcore fans have scared me off from fighting games... most recently Melty Blood. I don't want to play now that all the hardcore guys are playing. There is nothing rewording, you can't play casually to compete now. If you can do 20-40+ hit combo's, you can't compete now.


Its sad, but its the truth i feel. Hardcore fans are killing the genre. The quality of the games be damned.
User avatar
TheXev
The only Karon Fanboy
 
Posts: 494
Joined: February 10th, 2004, 2:17 am
Location: Corry PA, USA

Unread postby Raitei » October 23rd, 2007, 1:42 pm

TheXev wrote:IMO, its the genre's fans that are killing the genre. Hardcore fans have scared me off from fighting games... most recently Melty Blood. I don't want to play now that all the hardcore guys are playing. There is nothing rewording, you can't play casually to compete now. If you can do 20-40+ hit combo's, you can't compete now.


Its sad, but its the truth i feel. Hardcore fans are killing the genre. The quality of the games be damned.

???do you mean that the hardcore fans are the one to be blamed for decreasing the quality of the game?

boy, I didn't realize there's something like that can be done... :o
btw, it's true that street fighters isn't popular anymore...the rating's far below tekken(or so I think...)
"Introduce a little anarchy. Upset the established order and everything becomes... chaos.
I'm an agent of chaos."
Fate/world providence
User avatar
Raitei
OMG! WTF WHO SET THIS TITLE! LULZ
 
Posts: 2277
Joined: August 7th, 2007, 12:26 pm
Location: Distant wilderness

Unread postby Testman » October 23rd, 2007, 1:44 pm

No, I'm saying they're to blame for people not wanting to play anything in the genre anymore. The only truly good game in the genre that i ever played was Power Stone. It had everything, and you couldn't become a super bad ass playing it. Some people call that cheap, I call that fair.


[Edit]Damnit, i posted under the testing account... guess i can't delete it anymore.... -_-
Testman
 

Unread postby TheXev » October 23rd, 2007, 1:48 pm

[so much for that button that deletes all post made by a particular user in the admin panel. Yes that was me btw, testing crap.]
User avatar
TheXev
The only Karon Fanboy
 
Posts: 494
Joined: February 10th, 2004, 2:17 am
Location: Corry PA, USA

Unread postby Raitei » October 23rd, 2007, 2:08 pm

TheXev as Testman wrote:No, I'm saying they're to blame for people not wanting to play anything in the genre anymore. The only truly good game in the genre that i ever played was Power Stone. It had everything, and you couldn't become a super bad ass playing it. Some people call that cheap, I call that fair.

oh, I get it now :D

I just remembered that I played tekken 5 with my friend in my other friend's psp via bluetooth; I was beaten 5 times in a row, each 3 rounds, no round that I won, and 4 times perfect win by him....
(whoa,I cannot imagine that there're combos that continue forever until the opponent's knocked out:shock: )
:cry:

after that, I challenged him again when we went out together to the arcade and the result was the same, or even worse :cry:
man, all godlike hardcore players really pissed me off these days.. do they have nothing left to do except playing games??
"Introduce a little anarchy. Upset the established order and everything becomes... chaos.
I'm an agent of chaos."
Fate/world providence
User avatar
Raitei
OMG! WTF WHO SET THIS TITLE! LULZ
 
Posts: 2277
Joined: August 7th, 2007, 12:26 pm
Location: Distant wilderness

Unread postby drizzt_rocks » October 23rd, 2007, 2:15 pm

What u guys are saying is true to an extent but blaming the hardcore gamers is going over the top. I think what's really killing the genre is that games are evolving. Other genres have tons more to offer than plain old one on one fighting with a crappy story. What used to be good isn't always still good...

And also we don't know whether this game will be 2D or 3D so don't assume anything just yet.
And the cutest anime character award goes to ... PINO
User avatar
drizzt_rocks
Crack Desu!
 
Posts: 399
Joined: April 19th, 2007, 1:43 pm
Location: Horny land

Unread postby marus » October 24th, 2007, 6:10 am

Warning: long post + more of my life story ahead.

TheXev wrote:IMO, its the genre's fans that are killing the genre. Hardcore fans have scared me off from fighting games... most recently Melty Blood. I don't want to play now that all the hardcore guys are playing. There is nothing rewording, you can't play casually to compete now. If you can do 20-40+ hit combo's, you can't compete now.


Its sad, but its the truth i feel. Hardcore fans are killing the genre. The quality of the games be damned.


There has to be more to it than that. Every genre has a hardcore base, not just fighters. Hell, FPS is one of the most competitive genres, but still manages to hold on to a large casual market in the West. Though I can somewhat understand what you mean, I don't think the problem stems from the hardcore fanbase so much as a lack of casual fans. Afterall, an FPS pro will waste a FPS n00b, an RTS pro will waste a RTS n00b, and a Racing game pro will waste a Racing n00b, but all of those n00bs (or newbs, if you prefer) have a large pool of other players around their skill level to play against, so they don't have to worry about getting good if they just want to screw around, yet still have a chance to get better by playing many different people. In fighting games you don't have that so much (outside of Japan anyways); pretty much everyone either is a pro or just stopped playing because either a) they didn't like the game, or b) they thought the game was cool but got discouraged because they never stood a chance against anybody they played. It's a vicious trap - there isn't a casual market for these games, which discourages the creation of a casual market, and new players.

drizzt_rocks wrote:What u guys are saying is true to an extent but blaming the hardcore gamers is going over the top. I think what's really killing the genre is that games are evolving. Other genres have tons more to offer than plain old one on one fighting with a crappy story. What used to be good isn't always still good...


I think that's a big reason that there isn't a good casual market right now. Other games offer more than just competitive gaming - single player modes with engaging(ish) stories, and a kind of gameplay that can't be found in a multiplayer scenario. With a strong single player mode, a player can still have fun playing by themselves, and afterwards they have that cool feeling of just finishing a really fun game, and they want to play some more. That in turn leads to the birth of a strong casual multiplayer market, which helps create more gamers who may eventually decide to put enough time to compete against the hardcore fans. However, most fighting games don't have that kind of single-player experience: the AI is usually mind-numbingly dumb, either falling for the same move over and over, or being impossibly precise, with reaction time and precision that would be impossible in a real match (yet still being mind-numbingly dumb). And the lack of any story or gameplay variety doesn't help either. So unless you have somebody else around your skill level who for whatever reason is willing to play with you, there isn't much of a reason to play any new fighting game.

I realize that's important because, now that I think about it, I probably wouldn't be into fighters now if I hadn't gotten into Melty Blood while living in Japan, in the same circumstances that I had. I first heard about Melty Blood after watching the Tsukihime anime, then googling it because there was a bunch of stuff that didn't make sense to me (go figure). I didn't think much of Melty Blood when I first saw it, but I ended up exploring Evospace's giant website of Tsukihime lore. And, well... I thought it was really cool! Even though I hadn't read Tsukihime, and only read a small portion of his enclycopedia, I got really into it, and at that point decided that I'd give Melty Blood a try. So I ended up downloading it (yeah I suck, though I ended up buying it shortly after), and I liked it, but more because I had an attachment to the characters rather that me loving the intense CPU action. After the initial adrenaline rush of story started to fade, and I was starting to lose interest, something else important happened - Act Cadenza was released in arcades. That's when I started to begin my plunge into the world of fighters; now that I had a whole metropolis of people to play with, I had a reason to keep playing the game. Although I got my ass handed to me the first time I played in an arcade, I wanted to get better, so I bought an arcade stick and practiced. And while in the beginning I got discouraged and thought that there was no way I was going to get to a competing level, I eventually learned I could play people at different skill levels depending on which arcade I went to. So I kept playing, wanting to get better so I could fight in the better arcades, and by the time I left Japan I found that I could take on (some) of the people in my local arcade (Cat's Eye, Machida), and I didn't die as embarrassingly as I did in Akihabara's Club Sega. And even now I'm still playing and getting better (though not as fast since I have nobody to play with).

Umm, that was a long-winded story, but anyways the point I'm trying to make, is that in order to get into a competitive game it first has to be engaging enough to draw the player into its world. For me that was the story of Tsukihime. It then has to have both a strong casual and hardcore base, so that a player has a variety of people to play with, and can hopefully find people around their skill level to practice against. The arcades of Japan were a perfect environment for me, in that I could play people at my skill level, but still look at better people and see what I could do better. If I didn't have that kind of environment I wouldn't be as into fighters as I am now. And the last thing that I didn't really go over too much, is that the game has to be fun on all levels. Even when I was getting my ass handed to me, I was still having a good time watching what others were doing, and eventually learning how to react in certain situations.

From all of this, I see that Street Fighter IV has a lot to overcome in order to breathe life back into fighters. But if it retains its tradition of deep and engaging gameplay, while also emphasizing a good story, lovable characters, a single-player mode that's actually worth playing through, perhaps some innovations to help it stand out against the other fighting games, and maybe some good netplay to allow people to play together (since arcades are really just an ancient fairy tale), then perhaps it can bring in a new market that will lead to the growth of the fighting game genre.

Oh, and if you're wondering why I care about so much whether Street Fighter IV makes it, I just like fighting games in general, and I think that this game has the best chance out of any to bring in some new players, so that I can once again have some competition for me to bring myself to a higher level of play.
KATTO!
User avatar
marus
Crack Desu!
 
Posts: 356
Joined: October 22nd, 2005, 9:57 am
Location: Washington (state)

Unread postby TheXev » October 25th, 2007, 11:27 am

marus wrote:Warning: long post + more of my life story ahead.

TheXev wrote:IMO, its the genre's fans that are killing the genre. Hardcore fans have scared me off from fighting games... most recently Melty Blood. I don't want to play now that all the hardcore guys are playing. There is nothing rewording, you can't play casually to compete now. If you can do 20-40+ hit combo's, you can't compete now.


Its sad, but its the truth i feel. Hardcore fans are killing the genre. The quality of the games be damned.


There has to be more to it than that. Every genre has a hardcore base, not just fighters. Hell, FPS is one of the most competitive genres, but still manages to hold on to a large casual market in the West. Though I can somewhat understand what you mean, I don't think the problem stems from the hardcore fanbase so much as a lack of casual fans. Afterall, an FPS pro will waste a FPS n00b, an RTS pro will waste a RTS n00b, and a Racing game pro will waste a Racing n00b, but all of those n00bs (or newbs, if you prefer) have a large pool of other players around their skill level to play against, so they don't have to worry about getting good if they just want to screw around, yet still have a chance to get better by playing many different people. In fighting games you don't have that so much (outside of Japan anyways); pretty much everyone either is a pro or just stopped playing because either a) they didn't like the game, or b) they thought the game was cool but got discouraged because they never stood a chance against anybody they played. It's a vicious trap - there isn't a casual market for these games, which discourages the creation of a casual market, and new players.


You make a good point. I recently read about Unreal Tournament 3, that they are focusing heavily on single player, as many people spent a lot of time playing single player in the original UT, but didn't in UT2k3/4 (I know personally I'd spend a lot of time in single player, mostly because i was on a modem... but i would practice to take on my friends at the next LAN party). Halo 3 is very popular online, but how many people are playing the game in single player campaign? Quite a few, i guarantee it. I think your 100% correct, MeltyBlood got it right the first time with its impressive Single Player mode. No other game in the genre has that. Its a disappoint to have AC and not have story mode, even if it "the same old story mode." But also, I have the factor I deal with of not having that "I gotta get ready for LAN" mentality. I might have an awesome internet cafe right down the street, but it seems really hard to just go down solo and play. I should just start hanging out there and meet some local gamers... I'm sure that'd help me get out of this funk I'm in.

...I was spoiled in High School having so many awesome friends to go LAN with...

drizzt_rocks wrote:What u guys are saying is true to an extent but blaming the hardcore gamers is going over the top. I think what's really killing the genre is that games are evolving. Other genres have tons more to offer than plain old one on one fighting with a crappy story. What used to be good isn't always still good...


marus wrote:I think that's a big reason that there isn't a good casual market right now. Other games offer more than just competitive gaming - single player modes with engaging(ish) stories, and a kind of gameplay that can't be found in a multiplayer scenario. With a strong single player mode, a player can still have fun playing by themselves, and afterwards they have that cool feeling of just finishing a really fun game, and they want to play some more. That in turn leads to the birth of a strong casual multiplayer market, which helps create more gamers who may eventually decide to put enough time to compete against the hardcore fans. However, most fighting games don't have that kind of single-player experience: the AI is usually mind-numbingly dumb, either falling for the same move over and over, or being impossibly precise, with reaction time and precision that would be impossible in a real match (yet still being mind-numbingly dumb). And the lack of any story or gameplay variety doesn't help either. So unless you have somebody else around your skill level who for whatever reason is willing to play with you, there isn't much of a reason to play any new fighting game.


This is another point. I don't have many local arcades to go to. I did get to experience this feeling recently, however, when i was up in Daytona Beach at an Arcade to play Initial D Arcade Stage 3. I haven't played in 2 years, but it was fun to race some people, and get my butt kicked... and to kick some butt. We all learned new stuff from each other and areas to improve in. I don't get that living in Kissimmee, and the arcades are all too far out of the way to bother with most of the time(and are on the other side of Orlando).

I still haven't been to Disney Quest... i really should go.
User avatar
TheXev
The only Karon Fanboy
 
Posts: 494
Joined: February 10th, 2004, 2:17 am
Location: Corry PA, USA

Re: Street Fighter IV

Unread postby kranchroy » August 5th, 2010, 10:29 am

I'm enjoying SSFIV more than SFIV. I finally pulled combos Ryu and Ken's Ultra Smile I mainly track two ultras, so I'm mega happy with it. The price for the game is excellent. If the game were sold at the usual price of £ 30-40, then you would have an uproar. I think that DLC would be necessary if the update SSFIV.
kranchroy
Totally hardly posted
 
Posts: 5
Joined: August 5th, 2010, 7:20 am


Return to General Chat

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests